Month: September 2015

How NOT to take the GMAT

I attempted the GMAT for the third time today. I was hoping this would be my final attempt and I would be able to hit round 1 with a solid score in the 700s. I learned a few important lessons today.

  • Do NOT run out of time on your essay. Even if there are small errors you notice with 10 seconds left on the timer. A score of 0 is far worse than a score of 4.
  • Bring cough drops
  • Practice pacing your answers, especially in quant. I finished with 37 seconds left and didn’t feel rushed at all. Practice really paid off.
  • Do NOT sit next to someone taking an ISS (?) test or any test that requires a massive amount of books. Listening to someone shuffle through pages, slide their chair between two desks, and shuffle through more pages is distracting. OK, it’s VERY distracting.
  • Be prepared for anything, just like in real life.

End result: 660. Quant: 46 Verbal: 35

Score cancelled.

The good news is that the quant has improved. I’ll take the credit for tanking the verbal section even though I spent half of the time taking my neighbor’s test with him. This goes to show that, like in the business world, things do not always go as planned.

It looks like all my round 1 applications are being pushed to round 2. I am not sure if I should risk round 1 with a 690 or take a chance on a smaller pool of open spots with a higher GMAT.

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The Consortium Event in SF

MBA Diversity Hosted by Google

I went to my first MBA event last night. This one was hosted by the Consortium and it was held at the Google offices in San Francisco. The offices were beautiful and there are nice views outside of the Bay Bridge and SF Bay. Google does what it does best and had tons of free food. It was nice to see some Googlers still working deep into the night. This is one of the reasons I love Silicon Valley. The spirit to love your job and work beyond the normal 9 to 5 is encouraged and rewarded. The east coast still doesn’t get it.

The event was great. Several schools had a panel for a Q&A session. The event was a diversity event but the questions asked were the types of questions asked on any website and/or webinar. I was a little skeptical that I would fit in at a “diversity” event since I am not a minority or a woman. I suppose this is a stereotype that I have been guilty of. I even dropped my reservation to a Diversity Weekend at Berkeley Haas because I wasn’t sure I would fit in. However, to me diversity is about inclusion. It’s about enabling the business school dream for groups who are not the typical MBA type. Former military and first-generation college graduates seem like a under-represented group to me. But, I was still worried I would stick out like a sore thumb. I am glad my concerns were unwarranted. The event was truly about inclusion and making opportunities available to all sorts of different groups. Props to The Consortium and the great attendees!

Schools in Attendance (that I can remember)

  • Dartmouth (Tuck)
  • Virginia (Darden)
  • Texas (McCombs)
  • UC-Berkeley (Haas)
  • Indiana (Kelly)
  • UNC (Keenan-Flagler)
  • Wisconsin Business School
  • Carnegie Mellon (Tepper)
  • NYU (Stern)

The panel was great and then the MBA Fair portion opened up. It was great to meet with actual ambassadors from some of the schools. The team at Indiana University was by far the most outgoing. I hadn’t really considered the school before but they get points for sales. I also spoke with a couple Haas students and really enjoyed their stories and input. One was a Navy lawyer and had awesome advice for my application. Military experience is huge at some of these schools so I really have to sell it. I have spent so much of my life trying to NOT identify with my military experience so this is a relief. He also highlighted the fact that rank is not a deal breaker. They don’t look at officers only. If you have strong experience and leadership stories then you are good to go.

I spoke with the Tuck representative and her advice was to definitely visit the campus if possible. I had worked with a few Tuck alum in the past and they had great things to say. The campus is remote but it’s a truly old-school college feel. If I do a campus tour I will be sure to add Tuck as a destination.

One table that didn’t get as many visits was the Texas representative. This was surprising as Austin is a very entrepreneurial city and the Texas computer science program is very highly ranked. Texas, at least that region, is awesome. I took the time to introduce myself and really gather his thoughts on the process. I mentioned that I have several close friends that went to A&M and they might disown me if I go to UT-Austin. I am hoping when it comes to application time I will be remembered positively.

I didn’t get to interact with the team from Tepper. They were pretty busy. I have a couple events coming up and I really want to hear more about their program. Tepper is in my top 5 and I am behind in communicating with the school. They’ll be on the campus tour list.

Lessons Learned 

1) More Confidence – Way too often I used the phrase “It’s definitely a challenge” or “It will be a challenge”. I’m applying at top 25 MBA programs as a 34-year old veteran from a tech background. Challenging is an understatement. It should also be assumed as the rejection rate at these programs is so high. Also, as an older learner who is going to switch careers and probably face a 50% pay cut, I should expect challenge. The admissions committees and representatives don’t want to hear that it’s hard for me. They need to hear how I took reins and owned it.

2) Smile – Body language and non-verbal communication is huge. I typically work with techies or by myself so there’s not a lot of personality. I noticed my posture gives in and I have a default scowl on my face. It’s not that I am not interested in what people are saying, it’s just what has formed over the years. I will be more inviting, open, and warmer at the next event. This is a critical communication skill and one of my goals for the MBA program. Can’t hurt to start early.

3) Suit Up! – I went out in the morning and bought some new threads. I am sure glad I did. I am not a black-tie kind of guy so it’s been a while since I wore one with a jacket. I felt very confident in my suit and tie. All the exercise lately is really paying off. While these events may be more informal I feel more is expected of me. It’s easy to loosen a tie or put it in a pocket. It’s embarrassing to be under-dressed. Especially if you are trying to make a lasting impression on school representatives.

4) Follow Up – Send out emails thanking the representatives for their time. It’s all about lasting impressions.

I strongly encourage anyone looking at an MBA to go to as many programs like this as they can. It’s not a bunch of drones in suits trying to get consulting jobs. It’s not a popularity contest. It’s people who really want you to come to their school. Take the opportunity to practice social skills and learn more about the great programs. More information about The Consortium can be found here:

http://www.cgsm.org/

GMAT Accommodations – Not Very Accommodating

This is one of those “I wish I knew this earlier” moments. I read on mbaapplicant.com that GMAC and Pearson are able to offer accommodations such as extra time, longer breaks, etc. I had already registered for the test so figured I would look into this later. After registering for my second attempt I reached out to the accommodations department to see if I could get extra time or extra breaks on the exam. I don’t disclose it often but I am a veteran diagnosed with PTSD and a few other physical disabilities. While I don’t let it define me, I know it’s there and something I live with. Taking a test in an enclosed room with no way out and uncomfortable chairs hunched over a computer screen definitely reminds me it’s there . So, after hearing about the accommodations I figured it was worth a shot.

I sent a request a couple weeks before my second attempt. I was hoping there was a way to get it done quickly because I didn’t know about it earlier. The accommodations department emailed me back stating that it usually takes 3-4 weeks and there is no expedited services available. I am on a time crunch so that news was unfortunate. My third attempt is on September 28 so I won’t be able to get accommodations for that either. The challenging part is that you have to submit the request, submit all documentation (they are very thorough), and submit payment information. They then schedule the test for you.

As I look back it might have been useful to request accommodations earlier. However, I can go into my MBA applications knowing that I earned whatever my score through hard work, not special treatment. There are people with serious disabilities who don’t know about the accommodations. Giving these people the chance to overcome their disabilities and not be defined by them seems to make sense. I will post some links below for the prosperity of future generations.

Official mba.com accommodations page – This page has the documentation guidelines and application.

Manhattan Prep accommodations discussion – Stacey Koprince’s post based on conversations with two official GMAT Accommodations officials and Tova Elberg, a clinical psychologist. Very useful.

Veritas Prep accommodation summary – Good overview and sage advice: Don’t wait until the last minute to apply for accommodations.

Official PDF guide and application for accommodations – Definitely get this after reading the mba.com link above.

 

 

 

 

 

HBS Accept – Great Resume Tips

  1. One Page!  You can maximize space by reducing your contact information, which will already be included in the application forms.
  2. Make a new resume for the MBA application. Your application resume should be easily understandable for someone outside your function and your industry.  This will take more work than you might think.  Ask someone outside your function and industry to review your resume to eliminate jargon, acronyms, etc.
  3. Create a resume with 2-3 sections.  If you have enough work experience include college internships in your education section.  I was told to include education first (not sure how important that is, but I took the advice).
  4. Always be thinking what makes you special. Were you given international assignments? Did you prepare deliverables for executives or board members? What have you accomplished that someone else in your role would not have? Action verbs are your friends. Your resume should not read as a job description for your replacement.

 

Source: My Top 4 Tips and Tricks for a MBA Resume